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20131028
20131105
STATION
CSPAN 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
to a recent u.n. report, in the two years of conflict syria has lost 35 years of human development progress. with the two million refugees, this is a national crisis that has become a regional crisis putting serious strains on the neighboring countries. behind these jarring statistics is the real toll on the syrian people, the kids who haven't gone to school for two years, the women who have endured rape and abuse and the 5 million internally displaced syrians who don't have a place to live or enough to eat. as the crisis has escalated, we have accelerated our humanitarian response. our assistance is now reaching about 4.2 million people inside syria and we're helping to support 2 million refugees. but the same stubborn challenges that i talked about seven months ago, access, security and resources continue to prevent us and others from reaching everybody who needs help to get it and things continue to escalate. in early october, fueled by the political momentum of the security council's resolution to eliminate the chemical weapons, the u.n. security council unanimously passed a presidentia
on destroying and dismantling the chemical weapons infrastructure supplied. today the u.n. confirms it has destroyed equipment syria used to make chemical weapons with. so far inspectors have visited 21 chemical sites identified by syrian authorities within the timeframe specified. the two remaining sites are in contested areas where the challenge of getting there is more difficult, but i hope ultimately can be succeeded at as well. let me conclude by saying i want to make clear my views at the outset, the united states cannot and should not be the key that resolves every dispute in this egion, but we have a very real strategic stake in this region to make sure that syria does not become a failed state. we need to increase our humanitarian assistance and insist on humanitarian access as well as increase our support communities hosting syrian refugees in lebanon and jordan and to getting others in the international community to live up to their responsibilities in this regard. calling on donor nations to join us in this time of greatest need, because syria is a global problem. we need an an
, especially from from europe.t -- kuwait hosted the u.n. appeal conference last january and has itself contributed a little more than $300 million. notably, russia and china have contributed very small amounts. asre is a goal, especially we look at the extraordinary needs that continue to amount -- bring as many people into the financing of this humanitarian effort as possible. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> senator rubio. >> let me begin before i ask my questions -- i don't want the tone of my questions or direction in any way not to reflect on my admiration for your service to our country. and not only that, where you have shown consistent interest in the syrian people. but we have a chance to ask a question about the strategy. let me begin with something i think i know the answer to. you have referred repeatedly how the future of the syrian people belongs to the syrian people. whatou also believe that happens there is in our vital national interest. senator, just the fact that syria has the risk of destabilizing the region and become a base for terrorism, absolutely. >> i just want
with the u.n. right-to-protect interventions beginning in the 1990s? general keith has said the nsa and the cyber threat commands with the u.s. army are indistinguishable. what is the potential impact with the right to protect with domestic issues and foreign issues? a classic example would be with the mexican cartels and all instances across the mexican border and with syria. >> want to start domestic and go foreign or start foreign and go domestic? one of the problems on overeignty is the actual definition of sovereignty. one of the problems we had in pakistan was that in questions when we were accused of violating the sovereignty of pakistan to kill osama bin laden, one of the counter arguments made from our side was that pakistan does not control the entire sovereignty of its country. the pakistani army does not extend its writ to the border f afghanistan. that is one of the reasons america has to take other measures. what i am getting at is be careful about the solidity of sovereignty. it is a spongy concept in a lot of the countries we are dealing with. second, the idea of how
humanitarian assistance which has gone to the u.n. and multilateral agencies, some of which goes through the syrian government. point?s that your caller: pretty much. thank you. guest: the issue of lethal , lethal sport to the syrian armed opposition is done covertly through the cia. because of the nature of the know the exactt nature of what is being sent or how much. there have been allegations that things have started to move more towards the end of august into september. it's not clear how much is going. the are advocating that program should become a pentagon program, which would make it more open and make it much more robust. point,aura makes this when was the last time you heard our government say that assad must go? guest: now the gears have shifted towards diplomacy, first with a joint framework with the russians that led to a un security council resolution to read syria of its chemical weapons. beings also more work done with the russians to see if we can rejuvenate the geneva process. while i think we have been clear that the geneva process in the u.s.'s interpretation should
network. you may recall the red line said by the israeli prime minister at the u.n. regarding the ability of iran to produce a nuclear weapon. based on the expertise available to your agency, if the iranians were to decide to produce nuclear weapons, how far do you think they are from achieving that goal? if i may have a second shout out >> i do not understand your question. >> do you have any assessment that if iran were to produce a nuclear weapon, how long would it take to do that? second question on the issue of sanction, do you think any easing of the sanctions now would create a more positive atmosphere for negotiations between your agency and iranians? thank you. >> well, these two issues -- unfortunately, these are not my field. how long it will take for them to build a new go question was one of your questions. our function is to how to -- we are not providing [indiscernible] i hope you understand our function. also, regarding the sanctions, we do not have a lot of sanctions. what we do is send the inspectors to the ground. we verify and we share the information with member state
't have time to make a new portrait so they took an old picture of the u.n. secretary- general and pasted it against the background of tropical trees and african landscapes that had been intended for lumumba. you can now buy the portrait of lumumba on the cover of time that never got to the cover of time. >> can you also see the cover and see the background? >> absolutely. it is quite incongruous. he should have been portray trade against a very different background. you've got the background of of thisbut the picture scandinavian diplomat. >> you point out in your book that ho chi minh was in new york and worked in new york as a pastry chef for a while. here is some video of him. i want you to put him in context. is of the blood sweat and tears school. you don't fight a revolution for without being of the blood sweat and tears school. they are much more competent than that. i am very much afraid that if ho chi minh were to make up his mind, that this is the war to see through, then he might be the man to see it through. a shrewd communist revolutionary. itsunited states it clear willingn
is staggering. according to a recent u.n. report, in the two years of conflict, syria has lost 35 years of human development progress. ,ith the 2 million refugees this is a national crisis that has become a regional crisis about putting serious strains on neighboring countries. there is a toll on the syrian people, the kids who have not gone to school for two years, women who've endured rape and abuse, and the 5 million displaced syrians who do not have a place to live or enough to eat. at the crisis has escalated, we have accelerated a response, and our assistance is now reaching about 4.2 million people inside syria, and we are helping to support 2 million refugees. the same stubborn challenges that i talked about seven months ago, access, security, and resources, continued to prevent us and others from reaching everybody who needs help to get continues toed escalate. in early october, field by the momentum of the resolution to eliminate the chemical weapons, un security council unanimously passed a presidential statement on humanitarian access. this statement urges all parties to the conflict
to protect if we have already set a precedent with the u.n. beginning with a 99 these -- .ith the 1990s the nsa and the cyber threat commands with the u.s. army are indistinguishable. what is the potential impact with the right to protect with domestic issues and foreign issues. a classic example would be with the mexican cartels and all instances across the mexican and californian order and with syria. start domestic and go foreign or start for rent and go domestic? foreignhe problems -- and go domestic? one of the problems we had in pakistan was that in questions when we were accused of violating the sovereignty of pakistan to kill osama bin laden, one of the counter arguments made from our side was that pakistan does not control the entire sovereignty of its country. the pakistani army does not ofend its writ to the border afghanistan. that is one of the reasons america has to take other measures. bet i am getting at is careful about the solidity of sovereignty. it is spongy with the countries we are dealing with. second, the idea of how this has changed over the last 18 years. clear
together quickly -- fairly quickly to the surprise of many people a set of deals with u.n. resolution which is now being implemented. to me this opens the door to a number of opportunities. i will quickly sketch them out. certainly we have worked together, and steve might mention this, in cooperative threat reduction on cooperation in the destruction of chemical weapons stockpiles. that experience, i think, can parlay itself into some very useful technical cooperation in this process. i think the u.s. will probably not want to send people to syria. the president said no boots on the ground, although this is the -- this is different than the use of force in a military attack mode. nevertheless, i think we should cooperate to the greatest extent possible in our common technical approach to the area. secondly, if it is necessary, and i believe in some cases it will be, particularly if some weapons will be transported out for destruction, we have a cease-fire. my own view is a cease-fire is an important step if it can be implemented and maintained. it is, indeed, a significant step that could b
with the u.n. right-to-protect interventions beginning in the 1990's? the nsa and the cyber threat commands with the u.s. army are indistinguishable. what is the potential impact with the right to protect with domestic issues and foreign issues? a classic example would be with the mexican cartels and all instances across the mexican border and with syria. >> want to start domestic and go foreign or start foreign and go domestic? one of the problems we had in one of the problems on sovereignty is the actual definition of sovereignty. one of the problems we had in pakistan was that in questions when we were accused of violating the sovereignty of pakistan to kill osama bin laden, one of the counter arguments made from our side was that pakistan does not control the entire sovereignty of its country. the pakistani army does not extend its writ to the border of afghanistan. that is one of the reasons america has to take other measures. what i am getting at is be careful about the solidity of sovereignty. it is a spongy concept in a lot of the countries we are dealing with. second, the idea of h
's aversion to discussing terrorist connections to the benghazi attack. the u.n. designation clearly notes jamal's connection to the benghazi attack, whereas the state department designation missed it. so the u.s. designation clearly notes jamal's connection to benghazi attack, the state department admits it. the u.n. says and our state department omits it? i believe there's an -- there's been pressure by the administration to omit this type of information from u.s. intelligence products. sending conflicting signals to both our allies and the countries that may have benghazi suspects of interest to the f.b.i. and i have a lot of confidence in the f.b.i., if they're just allowed to do their job. but if we're unwilling to identify their involvement in the attacks, it further erodes u.s. credibility and asking for access to these individuals. this willful blindness is disingenuous and i believe ultimately dangerous. in january, when i offered an amendment to create a select committee to the house rules package for the 113th congress, speaker boehner told the epublican conference that he didn'
. no accountability. n.s.a. spying on foreign leaders, u.s. officials claimed the president did not know about this. the president refuses to say whether he knew or not, but anyway, lower level operatives officially blamed. n.s.a. spying on americans, the president claims he did not know the extent of spying on americans. lower level operatives blamed, no accountability. mr. speaker, exactly who is running the country? lower level operatives? has the government gone wild? are they operating without the knowledge of the white house? is the president out of tune with what's taking place within his own administration? or is he aware of those actions? if the president was unaware of all of this, the white house needs to hold people accountable, hold these lower level operatives accountable for their actions, their improper actions, their incompetence. the white house needs to fix this out-of-control government immediately. the white house needs to take responsibility for the actions of his administration and quit blaming others and lower level operatives. that is the white house's responsibility. after
, french, and now news reports say 60 million phone calls in spain were monitored by n.s.a. a bit more history about the n.s.a. and their spying. the department of justice stealthly seized information from 20 different associated press reporters or press phone lines, including some in the u.s. capitol, right up there. the department of justice stealthly seized phone records of fox news reporter, james rosen, his parents, and several fox news phone lines. in the month of january of 2013 billion phone calls were monitored worldwide, and at least three billion of them were phone calls in america. the n.s.a. stealthly seized from verizon business network services millions of telephone records, including the location, numbers, and time of domestic calls. a secret government program called, prism, allowed the n.s.a. to search photos, emails, and documents from computers at apple, google, and microsoft, among many other internet sources. n.s.a. and the snoop and spy caucus say this spying on americans and our allies is necessary to catch the terrorists. they even claim terrorist attacks had b
, senator. we have to find that balance between the civil liberties and privacies of a u.s. citizen versus national security interests. that's where we're doing it. i do not have, as a representative of d.n.i., the luxury of going into a social media or publicly available database, pull information out of there and submit it as being the truth. the government has a responsibility and obligation to the citizens to ensure that information is true and accurate before we use it in an adjudicated process. >> i know my time is up. i can tell you obviously when our teenagers go online and get important information on social media and that yet we're not going to use it to find out that someone is involved in something, i think that's -- that's a little hard to believe. we need to take a commonsense approach to this. so my time is up. i also think we need to have random checks on people instead of relying on their own self-reporting. >> senator. thank you. senator heitkamp. >> thank you. i think this is such a critically important response and quick response to this horrible tragedy and i hope that
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)